Flowing facials

When I first started out in the spa industry in 2005 I was a licensed only as a massage therapist. I then later became licensed as a full specialist in the State of Florida. The Full Specialty license covers both Aesthetics and Nails. One of the things that surprised me when I went to school for skin care as how often we take our hands off the client. Coming a from a massage back ground it’s a big faux pas to step away from client and be hands off for longer than a few seconds. So, because of this Facials felt very choppy to me and didn’t like the amount of time I left the client during a facial treatment.

So, through some trial and error I figured out ways to minimize my loss of contact with the client. What I do is scan their face and do an eval when I go to pick up the client. Then I do another quick eval under the Mag lamp just make sure I know what their skin type. This is also when I’m asking what their concerns are and what they want to be addressed during the facial. While they’re getting on the table I will pull products and put them on a little art palette. The art palettes (basically it’s what you would use to put your paint on) you can find at a craft store for cheap. So, the palettes have all these little round divots to put product in and I dish everything out that I’ll need for their service. I always put the products in order of application, so everything is organized and easy to grab. This is also one way to watch your portion control and not use too much product.

This prep allows me to have a nice flow for the service. I’m not pausing to pull out a jar to get an additional product because it’s already out. I have everything within arm’s reach so I’m never really leaving the head of the table when I’m doing the facial. Whenever I can I always leave one hand on the client or near their head on the table. This allows the client to know where I am always.

One thing that is a pet peeve of mine is when Estheticians just put a product on and walk away. If I’m leaving an enzyme treatment on or a mask on for a while I’m not just sitting there I’m doing a massage on their neck, shoulders, arms, hands or feet. I’m not filling out a retail recommendation card or looking at my cell phone. So really the only time that my hands really leave the client as when I’m rinsing my hands or grabbing a towel from the hot towel cabinet. This hands-on approach can improve you flow and give your clients the touch they need.

How do you minimize your loss of client contact with your facial clients? Hear your feedback on how you can keep your facials from being choppy.

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